Humanure compost toilet

You do WHAT with your poo?

We made the decision to have humanure compost toilets inside and out! We like them; it means we are dealing with our own waste, you get compost out of it at the end (returning veggie scraps and food waste back to the earth). We´re also not wasting gallons of drinking water every time we flush and also we haven´t got to worry about plumbing for black water. Sounds like a winning decision if you ask me!!!!

We already have an outside toilet (well, a bucket with a toilet seat on top). We just needed to create our compost bays, gather the materials, and set ourselves up to be able to begin composting our humanure.

We used wombled pallets (x3) to create the bay structure. We placed these on top of a ´bowl´we created in the earth and screwed them together in a u-shape.IMG_20160310_134126268

We filled the bay with a bale of straw (loose).IMG_20160310_141541472_HDR

As an aside, we were massively proud of ourselves for getting the straw. Someone told us there was a man named Paco on the road out of town that sells hay and straw. They were our only directions. Well, we only bloody went and found Paco on his tractor in a field and managed to buy some straw from him! I don´t think I´ve been that proud of myself in some time!

Ahem, anyway, after filling the bay with straw and supporting the front with planks, the bay is ready to receive some caca! Although, of course, this being us, we hadn´t really thought through the position of the compost bay (we thought we had. We were wrong) and decided to move it to a shadier spot before filling!

The compost toilet itself is really simple. There´s a wooden box with a toilet seat on it. Inside there is a bucket. You do your business; toilet paper, urine and solid waste into the bucket and you cover your ´doings´with a good amount of sawdust. When the bucket is full. Put the lid on it and take it to the compost. You also need a good amount of kitchen scraps (veggie peels, egg shells, dinner leftovers etc) as well as green material (weeds pulled from the garden) when adding to the bay.

Down at the bay you make a hole or bowl in your hay (carbon material),  empty your kitchen scraps (broad range of nutrients and micro organisms), then layer your weeds (nitrogen material, plus broader range of nutrients) and on top, empty your humanure from the bucket. Cover the ´bowl´with plenty of hay and water and leave it do its thing. We keep a compost thermometer in the mound to check that the compost is reaching the correct temperatures.

And there you have it, pretty simple.

You collect into this bay for one year or until it is full. And then you simply begin a new bay. I recommend reading the Humanure handbook by Joe Jenkins for the ins and outs of creating a humanure compost system (it´s well written, funny and has all the information you need. you can also read it chapter by chapter online). Recommendations are that you leave your humanure for two years before using it. You can get a sample checked in a lab (there is a place in town here with us) to check for any remaining pathogens. We have decided to work on a three year cycle just to be sure, and to cover ourselves in case anyone is ill during the year that those extra nasty bugs are properly gone.

We currently just have an outside toilet, but eventually we will have additional ones in our indoor bathroom as well as just off the bedroom.

We were a little worried about smell. But we have been surprised by the total lack of smell. Nothing from the toilet, and nothing from the bay. And it has been hot. We are in the south of Spain with very little rain and so we were expecting at least a little whiff. But nope! Nada. Zilch!

Doing my business with a view like this, while recycling waste and not wasting water has made me feel rather smug!IMG_20160310_162905840

Living in Spain

We absolutely love living in Spain!

OK, so it hasn´t been a massive amount of time but we are loving it all the same!

It´s all very real now! I get up and go to work down on the coast and Matt goes to the land to work for the day! We meet at home, make dinner, repeat! Its all very normal, except the sun shines, the food is organic and fresh, people are happy and we are on our massive adventure!

Bryn´s nemesis!
Bryn´s nemesis!

Bryn is loving life! He hates the rain and would refuse to go out at home. Here, there hasn´t been many rainy days so he is in his element. He gets walked miles every day and has made lots of friends. He likes our land the best. He has an excellent view of the cabra (goats!) from the top terrace  and keeps his beady eye on them, warning off any that attempt to stray too close to his land! I think he thinks he is a goat, making daring climbs up ridiculously steep banks on our walks!

The scenery here is just amazing! Just walking out of the front door we have the Sierra Lujar on the left and the Sierra Nevada on the right. The constant chatter of birds is sometimes deafening, the music of the goat bells is magical and the mating frogs nearby are…well…loud! Owls hoot at night, the mules have a shouting match and there are only clear skies where more nights than not, you can see the milky way!

What can I say?
What can I say?

Yep, I think it´s safe to say that we are happy! We have met many lovely people! Some we´ve only spoken to once and others we see regularly. We have met people from all over. Who do all kinds of things. Everyone says hello in the street! We have had offers of help, and the lending of tools and time as well as lunch, coffee, cake and broken Spanish chats that have been truly enjoyable. We have loved struggling with the language. Gesticulating wildly in the street with the handful of words we know. We have branched out from individual words, to sentences and even full blown conversations! At least we think we have! Granted our vocabulary strictly contains words about gardens and tools, piping and plumbing but we are getting there.

We haven´t had much time to stop and miss everyone back home yet! We have had volunteers come and help us, an old friend come and stay, my parents come to visit, I´ve started a job teaching, met lots of new people, matt has been busy on the land and meeting new contacts, friends and like minded people, two of our best friends are coming to visit in May then more friends in June. We are so lucky to have support coming at us from all angles.

It hasn´t all been a bed of roses I will admit! The first house we stayed in was, let´s say, lacking in the cleanliness department, had been wired by god-knows-who! For a week I was getting static electricity shocks from everything, and couldn´t work it out! Turns out the house wasn´t earthed (which is just great for me with a pacemaker), the sewers backed up and all was looking a little dim (especially with the eventual lack of any electricity)! But then we moved to another place short term until our yurt arrived. Our yurt then didn´t arrive so we had to rent somewhere else….and then the yurt turned up! But, where we are staying is just beautiful, and if the yurt had turned up then we wouldn´t have had the opportunity to experience another part of town or countryside! We are living next door to a lovely Spanish couple with their young daughter, three dogs and two chickens!IMG_20160420_192614020_HDR

So this is our adventure story so far! I will update about individual projects we´ve been tackling when I get a chance. Life is getting in the way at the moment, and I don´t feel bad about that at all!

Hasta luego!