Looks like we’ve made it!

Orgiva
Orgiva

So we have finally arrived! We are in Spain, in Orgiva, and it feels soooo good to be back. We have driven through four countries to get here (Wales, England, France and Spain) and in my humble opinion, was well worth the drive rather than flying or getting the ferry.

Bryn all cosy in the van
Bryn all cosy in the van

We had quite a long drive UK side to even get to the Eurotunnel but tootling along in our van with the dog in the back was a great option. We had time to enjoy the countryside the whole way down, stop when we wanted to, and when Bryn needed to stretch his legs every hour or so, we could stop when it suited us!

I was a little apprehensive about the drive as I was doing all of the driving. This is why we decided to take five days over the journey. But as it turns out it has been absolutely fine (dare I say, enjoyable?!) We travelled about 4/5 hours a day (apart from the initial push on the first day which was 7 hours) and we stayed in some beautiful places along the way.

Here’s our route.

Day 1 – South Wales to Eurotunnel, Folkestone. Onwards to Rouen.

A two hour drive (through heavy rain) to Rouen where we booked the cheapest hotel we could stay with the dog. We stayed at Ibis budget hotel in Rouen and it was perfectly fine (clean and basic) for somewhere to rest our weary heads after a long day before getting up the following morning to go again.

Day 2 – Rouen to Dirac (about 8km from Angouleme).

The drive took about five hours, not including any stops. We arrived in our stunning hotel about 7pm. We stayed at Relais de Silence Domaine du Chatelard near Dirac, and what a bloody treat!

Relais du Silence - quite the treat!
Relais du Silence – quite the treat!

For the price of a basic B&B in the UK we had pure luxury! We couldnt quite believe they would allow the dog in but they were really excited to see us (well, mainly Bryn to be honest). As it turns out, the restaurant was absolutely fantastic and we had the most beautiful meal (and lovely bottle of red) with fantastic service. It wasnt what we are used to, but as a treat, was amazing!

Oh dear god!
Oh dear god!

The hotel is surrounded by a beautiful lake which we walked around the following morning (and where Bryn got to display his epic swamp monkey skills) before setting off again in our trusty van.

Day 3 – Dirac to Salinas de Ananas (Basque)

Another five hour drive to a wonderful Casa Rural near the salt plains in Basque country in the north of Spain. We stayed in Madera y Sal which is a recently renovated casa rural. I can highly recommend staying in this beautiful town and fantastic casa. Zuri and her husband have lovingly restored this old building over the last 14 years and it shows that its all been done with such care and love. We had the whole casa to ourselves and had a superb breakfast to set us up for our journey ahead (Spanish omelette, bread, fruit, fresh juice, salsa and of course some of the local salt). Again, we went for a walk in the morning around the salt plains which has much charm in its ugliness.

Only photo we have - shame!
Only photo we have – shame!

The beauty of the landscape is a huge contrast to the salt works, but the village is stunning and the mountains, breathtaking.

Day 4 – Salinas de Ananas to Toledo.

Up until now the drive had seemed a doddle, but today, although the drive was four instead of five hours, it seemed longer.

View from roof terrace in Toledo
View from roof terrace in Toledo

We arrived in Toledo while it was still light and the sun shone the whole way down. We checked into Apartamentos Alarife which was five minutes walk from the cathedral, smack bang centre of Toledo. We had fantastic views over the city which was great as we didnt actually have time to explore the city. Matt had a terrible nights sleep so we got up early and set off again on our final stretch.

Day 5 – Toledo to Orgiva.

Again, the drive seemed long today. It was four and a half hours long but seemed much much longer. Saying that, we were so excited to cross into Andalucia and drive through the snow peaked Sierra Nevada that we forgot how tired we were when we realised we were on the home stretch. After Granada, I knew the way, and took great pleasure on turning off the sat nav to enjoy the drive. Before arriving in Orgiva we stopped off at our new house to walk Bryn along the riverbed at the bottom of our land. He seems to approve (which is always good). We then drove into Orgiva and stopped for tea in our favourite cafe (Baraka) before getting our keys for the house we will be staying in for the next few weeks.

And that’s about it. I can highly recommend the route we took. If we had the time and the money we would have preferred to stay in each place for more than one night, just to be able to experience each area fully (or at least more fully than we had the chance to). The Eurotunnel was easy, although a bit weird driving onto a train.

Driving onto the Eurotunnel
Driving onto the Eurotunnel

Also, by by taking our time I didn’t feel completely exhausted after our trip.

Bryn dealt with everything so well. He was comfortable in the back of the van (we took the window from the bulkhead so he could poke his head through) but we did worry about him as he didn’t eat for the first three days. He usually goes on hunger strike when we are away and we made sure he was drinking plenty of water but after three days, we weren’t happy. He was refusing his food so we bought him some meat and of course, he gobbled that straight up. This must’ve got his appetite going because he ate from that point on. We didnt take his bed into any of the hotels (Relais du Silence and Madera y Sal supplied a dog bed for Bryn) so that when we arrived at our final destination he would know, because we brought his bed in. This sounds so silly, but it did seem to work. He settled straight away in the house in Orgiva, whereas it took him a little while all of the way down.

So now all there is to do is enjoy Dia del Andalucia on Sunday/Monday and get stuck into our new community by enjoying shared paella and flamenco dancing before getting stuck in end of next week to clearing the land and visiting the local seed bank, starting off our summer veg and welcoming our first volunteers.

The endless move!

I always knew that moving house was super fun! I’ve moved more times than I’d like to remember. But this move…..

…This move has been epic!

Not only has it taken us longer than most moves as it had to happen in stages, but we also managed to turn it into some kind of weird comedy sketch show with me throwing out my back yesterday and having to drag Matt out of bed shivering and sweating with the flu to sort everything out with his dad and brother.

So this move started, really, back at the beginning of the year when we had to have major sorting times, decluttering times and massive downsizing times! These were the fun times (who knew at the time that this was the easy part!!!!? Not us…No-Sir-ee). So we shipped our relatively small amount of stuff to storage to be sent out to us in Spain at a later date! We were releaved to get this over with, now all we had to do was live like squatters with a matress as our bed, sofa and dining table, while sorting out the rest of the crap we had left behind! Easy-peasy! Pfft!

Where did all of this stuff come from?

I am very aware that most of the stuff is mine, not Matts. I had a huge room filled with teaching resources, arts and crafts things, teddies, puppets, laminating pouches, laminating machines, books, masks, Happy Birthday singing hats (yes, more than one??), reams and reams of velcro…and that’s just my teaching stuff! I had also managed to bring with me a huge bag of documents to be shredded from THREE houses ago (does it even need shredding anymore when the address doesnt match up to the name….good god!!!!) And so much other crap that there’s nothing to do but vow to change my ways!!!!! And I must change my ways!

On Saturday we hired a big van (as the doors on the back of my small van had miraculously decided to not open!) Cue sequence of events to turn our escapade into comedy nightmare! We moved LOADS! Two massive van loads to the recycling centre, a load to the charity shop, some stuff to my parents and other stuff to Matt’s dads. We moved all of this stuff while dealing with the most horrific flu we have ever experienced. Trying to lift heavy stuff when you feel too weak to lift your knife and fork is never a good thing! So we moved endless stuff while sweating and shivering, looking ghostly white and feeling like death but we did it! We HAD to do it!

By Sunday the house looked pretty empty…but its a big house. A big, deceiving, mean house that actually wasn’t empty at all! There are fitted cupboards everywhere and these were, yep, full of stuff! Stuff, stuff STUFF! So gradually, while Matt was left to sweat it out in bed, and me recovering from the evil flu, the house got emptied over the next few days and Wednesday was the day to clean and remove any last stuff that was hanging about, lurking!

Think Spain, think Spain, think Spain!!!
Think Spain, think Spain, think Spain!!!

By this point we were completely knackered, drained and pretty clammy! Our mantra has been ‘Think Spain, think Spain, think Spain’ it’s been keeping us going throughout the whole process. That and watching Permaculture documentaries, and humanure and greywater recycling videos on youtube (hey, whatever floats your boat right?)

We made an excellent start, upstairs the boys removing the endless stuff, me in the kitchen cleaning. We had music on, cracking on doing our duties and we decide we’ve earned a break! It was a nice day so we sat in the garden musing over our current predicament of the house not being as sorted as we’d hoped, when I get up to get back to it and BOOM! Holy fudge I’ve knackered my back!

 

Oh God! I had to lay down….I was out of the game! GAME OVER!

There was nothing I could do but be driven away to our temporary bed and to stay there stewing while the boys got on with it! And get on with it they did! What champions! I am so grateful to them and my friends who rallied together to help at the last minute!

So we are now out of the house. Our stuff has been stored ready for shipping and we have a few weeks of the nomadic lifestyle before we leave for Spain! It has been quite the adventure so far and we havent even left the country yet!

I am never, ever, ever moving again! Or at least if we do, then it wont be such an epic move as in our new house we are going to live an organised, minimalist, no-crap-laying-around, tidy kinda lifestyle that’ll be easy to pack up and move! Ha, yeah right, we can all but try! As my mother will probably say, “I’ll have to see it to believe it”, and I’d be inclined to agree!

Pre-move musings

I’m sitting here gazing out at Swansea bay. removal menInternational removal men been and gone! House is empty (ish) and Im looking out at our magnificent view wondering why I haven’t done more of this; just sitting and watching the tide go in and out! Our views in Orgiva are spectacular but I will really miss our views of Swansea. Within a thirty minute drive we can visit amazing beaches on the Gower, fantastic mountain walks, resevoirs, rivers, canals, and waterfalls. National Botanical Gardens of Wales and a shed load of castles!

Why are we moving again?

Ah yes, be able to live the life we really want (and be able to afford it), to be able to live off grid and become self sufficient! And the weather helps too! Plus we are exchanging good views with a-ma-zing views!

Wales is my home and always will be! I love it! I am Welsh through and through! And so are all my family! I speak Welsh and speak it every single day! I want our (currently non existent) children to be able to speak Welsh.  I will miss my friends and family so much but we really won’t be that far away! Plus, everyone wants free accommodation in the sun right?! So I’m sure we will get plenty of visitors!

Bryn house empty
It’s OK Bryn!

We will be sad to leave our house too! It’s been a happy three years living here! It’s been a really chaotic three years, but we have overcome so much here that we are also happy to be moving on. It’s bitter-sweet! It looks so empty at the moment that I now can’t wait to get moving!

As much as I’ll be sad to leave Wales, I am so excited to be diving head first into a new culture, country and language! I love that this is an adventure all of our own; just me, Matt and the dog! Its all ours! And so, if it all goes wrong then we only have ourselves to blame. Ha! On the other hand, we can claim major glory points WHEN it all goes well! I’m a glass-half-full kinda girl so I’m going with the latter option and all the glory points!

We have so much to do between now and getting to Spain, that our new home in Spain seems so far away (sigh!) I suppose I’d best get back to packing! It seems the story of my life at the moment. I think I’ll just finish my cuppa before getting up from this view though! I will miss this view!

 

When all your plans change…

 

IMAG3381

….kind of!

So we have many many changes to our original plan which was; get the builders in, we would fly down in February once they had done their basic work, we put in a kitchen, bathroom and tile the whole house and then its pretty livable. Then we were going to get our stuff delivered, then bring the dog down!

This isnt quite how things have worked out!

Best laid plans and all that….!

We’ve decided to drive down, through France and Spain with the dog and take 5 days over it. We’ve bought a small van to drive down with; and use for building materials when we are working on the house and I can get back and forth from work in it. We are hoping to rent a yurt for a month or two until the house is habitable.
I’ve given up on chasing buiders, im OK with the relaxed spanish attitude but I think we just need to be there to get anything done…which in hidsight is a much more sensible idea!
burnt windowSo we have decided to start clearing the upstairs ourselves when we get there. This involves, clearing the upstairs of burnt rubbish! Taking the render off the walls, pulling up floor tiles, cleaning the ceiling and getting rid of the burnt polystyrene thats stuck to the whole ceiling after the fire. While we are battling this we want to get in touch with our builder to do the downstairs work while we experiment with insulating with Hempboard and attempting to render upstairs. We are also going to tile the floors ourselves using natural terracotta tiles. We have chosen these tiles for a few reasons; they are the traditional flooring used in the area, they are ‘easy’ (ahem!) to lay and are more forgiving of a first time tiler. We will also seal the floors and so will be easier to keep clean. We are going to use the same tile throughout the house (upstairs and down) except in the bathroom where we will use decorative tiles.

Something like this?
Something like this?

We are not really intimidated by attacking the work ourselves, but there are some elements that we need skilled people to do for us. Like laying sewerage pipes and plumbing after removing the concrete floor downstairs, and cutting a hole in the ceiling to accommodate the stairs. I say we aren’t intimidated by the work but we haven’t got there yet so I’m sure it will be a shock. I am sure we will get there though. It will be slow work but actually it means we have greater control and can experiment with environmentally friendly materials other than the cement which was the only option given by the builder.
We are happier doing it this way, plus we will save some money (which is always good!) and be imensly satisfied with ourselves when we complete the project!

So, these are our plans. We still have to pack up our house here in Wales (we are very nearly there!!!) and be out of our rental house soon. So, as much as we can dream about our Spanish plans, we have a lot of work to do before we get there. This moving country malarkey is like a full time job!

Driving to Spain with the dog in tow!

Happy New Year!

After some major procrastinating over Christmas and Newbryn driving dog to spain Year, plans are finally rushing ahead and time seems to be running away too!Eek!

Luckily we thought to visit the vet with Bryn in November to sort out all of his travelling needs (where this inspiration came from I don’t know…we are not the most organised of folk). We were a little worried about snowballing costs but as it turns out, it hasn’t been as expensive as we had first thought (still a few hundred pounds though). He is so worth every penny. Look at that face…..

At his first vet visit, he had his puppy vaccination (we bloody forgot about his booster in May so we’ve had to start again…sigh!) He’s already had another visit for his second injection. He was feeling a little under the weather (not quite as mental) after his jabs, but is now back to his normal foolish self.

What he needs for Spain is a Rabies injection (due next week) and we are also vaccinating him agaisnt Kennel cough (not a requirement); Bryn is likely to be in contact with other dogs around our home in Spain so we thought ‘better to be safe than sorry’. We have ordered him a Leishmaniasis collar to protect him from sand and biting flies. The collar lasts six months, it is an expensive collar (£38 – gulp!) but the side effects of this disease are horrific; we are quite worried about this. But what are we to do? He’s coming with us…He’s our baby (and plus we’ve already told him he can come now….God, we’re sad).

Once his Rabies jab is done the vet can write up his passport. Then, 1-5 days before we trbryn swimming driving dog to spainavel, he has to have treatment for Tapeworm.

And that’s it! Bryn will be ready for international travel!

It has been pretty straightforward sorting Bryn out for the journey (shame we can’t say the same for ourselves). It has ended up costing us around £260 including his puppy jabs, three months worth of flea treatment, kennel cough jab, rabies jab, medicated collar and his passport! The whole process will have taken about 12 weeks in total! Not too bad! That’s one member of the family sorted!

How are we getting Bryn to Spain?

We have decided to drive down through France and Spain in the car using the Eurotunnel. We researched taking the Ferry to North Spain (Bilbao/Santander) but the cost was quite staggering (especially as you have to book a dog friendly cabin on top of our tickets and a ticket for Bbryn beach driving dog to spainryn). The drive is considerably shorter using the ferry but we decided it wasn’t for us after weighing up our options.

We are going to take five days to drive down to Orgiva and use it as an excuse for a holiday, taking our time over the drive, stopping in pet friendly hotels all of the way down. I don’t really want to be driving more than four/five hours a day so the plan is to make stops at Rouen, Bordeaux, Miranda del Ebro, Toledo and then Orgiva!
Bryn is pretty good in the car so we’re hoping he will be OK. We are happy with our decsion to drive the whole way as he will get to be toileted, fed, watered and run when he needs!

Fingers crossed we can get ourselves sorted for the journey too!

Have you done this journey before? If you have any hints and tips, that would be great! Places to check out, places or routes to avoid! Please leave a comment.

Let the adventure commence!

After much to-ing and fro-ing we finally own our home in Spain!

We are so excited that the adventure is moving forward after many a set back. The Spanish law of ‘one more document’ couldnt hold us back! No sir-ee!

It’s now all systems go with getting the builders in….although the mañana mañana relaxed attitude (which I love) is probably going to drive me crazy when dealing with builders as we are kind of against the clock.

The basic building work needs to be completed by the end of February at the latest so that we have a month to get a bathroom and kitchen in, as well as receiving our (not yet) packed up stuff from Wales, before I start work in April.

I have been really lucky in getting four weeks work not far from where we will be living. It’s a good start, and a definite step forward from where we thought we would be work-wise!

So now all that’s left to do is pack up our home in Wales!
No easy task!
It’s not just a case of throwing everything in boxes because we don’t want to take most things with us! We have muchos crap! So we need to declutter our large three bed semi into 250 cubic feet (about the size of a quarter of a single garage) hmmm!!! This task is made even more difficult in that I cannot throw anything away…we will have piles for donation for refugees (SHARP in Swansea), piles for the local charity shop, things that don’t belong to us that have ended up in our house that need to be returned, and I’m sure I have friends who need my old crap…yes? There will also be a (hopefully) small pile for the tip. And we will need to sell some furniture and sellable crap.
I am not looking forward to this mammoth task. The problem is starting. I have spent hours looking on Pinterest on ‘how to declutter your home’ and ‘reorganisation hacks’. I am queen procrastinator. I know exactly how to declutter my home, I dont need pinterest to tell me. But the pictures are so pretty and its much easier to visualise the house being packed up rather than actually packing up the house. Hmff!

Well, I suppose there’s nothing for it but to get going on the ol’ packing!
Wish me luck!

Volunteer on our eco project in Orgiva, Spain!

We will be accepting volunteers from about April 2015 to help in whatever aspects of the project you fancy or have specific skills in (or whatever we need help with at the time).

Upper terrace of our land
Upper terrace of our land

Initially, there will be clearing the land of long dry grass and experimenting with the asequia system and creating irrigation trenches. We will (hopefully) have set up a makeshift green house by then and started off seeds for the coming summer. We will also need help with emptying the ruins as well, also help in the house!

We will be creating a permaculture garden as well as a rocket stove for outdoor cooking. Building humanure toilets and redoing the outside shower room. There are also plans to build a community room from cob on the lower terrace. There really is so much to do that if you have a specific interest or ability in something, I’m sure we can accommodate. There are too many planned projects to list at the moment, but as we progress I’ll update what we will be looking for on a month by month basis! Just get in touch and let us know what you fancy doing and when.

You can get in touch via our workaway page, link below, or by leaving a comment at the bottom of the page:

Come and help us be self sufficient in Orgiva, Spain!

Church on main street through town
Church on main street through town

In exchange for your help we will offer you somewhere to stay and breakfast and dinner each day. As well as a fun and relaxed atmosphere. We like music and dancing and like to dance while we work.

To begin with we will only be able to offer a tent in the land, or, if you have a camper, there is space to park up on our land. But once we get a little more sorted, there will be a yurt on the land as well as a room in the house with us, and eventually, the ruins too.

IMAG3275The town itself has about 6000 residents and over 67 nationalities. Orgiva is the capital of the Alpujarra region in the south of Spain. About an hours drive from Malaga airport or an hour and a half bus journey from Granada. We live about a ten minute walk from the centre of Orgiva. Even though its so close, we live in rural heaven.

Baraka
Baraka

There are lots of bars and restaurants in town that cater for a range of diets. Our favourite is Baraka, serving a range of middle eastern food and a huge range of teas. The staff are awesome and there is free internet. What more could a girl want?  Oh…a glass of wine! For this we like Albertos. He has excellent red wine by the glass (or bottle).

IMAG2428On a Thursday, it’s market day! And the town comes alive and you really get to experience the alternative vibe of the town. Many people who live in the area (Beneficio) come down from the mountain and sell their various lovely things in the market. I have seen, jewellery, soaps, oils, perfumes, and scarves. I have also tried some homemade sushi (which was delish). IMAG2438The market also has a lot of vegetable and fruit stalls, people selling nuts, olives and sweets, as well as a large amount of stalls selling really big knickers!!!!

Local advertisments
Local advertisments

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Orgiva is a pretty alternative place. If you need a massage, reiki, soul healing, reflexology…I could go on. You won’t have to look far. There’s all sorts advertised on little pin boards around the town, offering horse healing, or silent retreats in the mountain. There are even a group of parents opening an alternative school for their children. With all of these things being offered, you can imagine it gives the town a special ‘feel’. Its a pretty lovely place, you should come and experience it for yourselves. Oh, and the sun shines a LOT. Need I say more?

We hope to hear from you soon.

The ruins!

There are old animal shelters adjoining our house. They are about ten meters long and three meters wide. Currently single storey (ish). We want to renovate these into holiday accommodation and offer holidays for families with children with autism. As well as havingIMAG3377 a space where friends and family can come and stay.

As the space is small we were worried that they wouldn’t be big enough to house a family. But after looking on Pinterest (my favourite place for house porn) and playing around with design software, we have worked out that we just need to be canny when designing the inside space. There is so much inspiration online now about designing your ‘tiny home’ or ‘narrowboat renovations’ that its easy to see how we can make this work.

There will be a small kitchen and seating area with a sofa bed, a bathroom, a double bedroom as well as a single bedroom.

Realistically, this isn’t going to get done for quite a while. We need to renovate our house first aIMAG3379nd at least get some basic planting done in the garden, as well as our veggie garden before even looking at this project! But, we won’t be waiting too long; oh no, no rest for the wicked; as we will need to have some kind of income in order to live.

We will be entertaining work aways/volunteers to help with our project. We are unsure how the walls of the ruins will hold up against being meddled with, and as much as we would like to keep as much of the original building as possible, we do have a congiency plan. If the walls need rebuilding, we will rebuild using cob or sand filled bottles. We are learning as we go. We have no experience of building in this way (or building generally, to be honest) so any help from volunteers who have experience in cob or alternative building will be greatly welcomed.

For now, the ruins will make excellent storage sheds!

Fire!!!

So, we received news that no first time buyer wants to hear! “There’s been a bit of an accident” – Oh God!

The sorry tale goes like this…

We’d had an offer accepted on the house after completely falling in love with it in the summer. It had lots of work to be done, but we were OK with it. We figured we could take our time with it while living in the upstairs flat while doing downstairs; the house is split into two flats but had been left half done.

Inside; before fire
Inside; before fire

But then we get an e-mail from our agent saying there’s been a fire!

A what now? A FIRE!

I won’t go into the ins and outs of how it happened, just know, that it definitely happened! After much inner (and outer) turmoil over what the bloody hell is going on we decide to go back to the negotiation table. New price settled, we book our flights back to Spain to asses the damage.

upstairs burnt main room

Yep, there was definitely a fire, but do you know what? We still loved the place, so we decided to carry on with sale. We must be bloody mad. Matt asked if I thought he was actually going crazy, but we concluded that if he’s crazy, then I’m crazy, so let’s go and be crazies together in Spain!

The damage is actually cosmetic. There was bare polystyrene on the ceiling and fabric on the walls so when the fire started it literally just went up. It didnt burn for long so the damage is cosmetic; even though it looks horrific! There are four rooms upstairs, they all look like this. But downstairs was untouched (as the flats are still separate) so that’s still as it was. Phew!

upstairs burnt view from bedroom into main room

So this is our new home. Isn’t she a beauty? It’s a shame about the fire, and I have been a little bit concerned about bad juju, but we’re going to make such happy memories here that any bad juju won’t stand a chance!

Just need to start the MAJOR cleaning operation now! That should be a few days of epic fun times!

Garden

Hmmm…it’s difficult to know where to start with the garden as there’s so much we want to do with it. And so much that has to be done before even starting.  I’ll start by describing what is there now.

Upper terrace
Upper terrace

The land we have with the house is about 1250 square meters, split into 2 roughly equally sized terraces. There is a big differnce in height between the two terraces and there is a pathway down one side to link the two.

Alberca
Alberca

On the upper terrace there is an alberca (water storage) and an outdoor bathroom. I use the term bathroom lightly. It’s a bit of a shack with a shower cubicle and a black hole toilet. I am having nothing to do with lifting the lid on the toilet, I am petrified of what I might find. So Matt has kindly offered to do that one. Phew! We dont know if there’s water connected to the shower but its definitely do uppable!

Outdoor 'bathroom'
Outdoor ‘bathroom’

The land itself has asequia rights (ancient Moorish irrigation system that uses the snow melt from the Sierra Nevada) for water to irrigate the land, but the land hasn’t been watered for about 4 years. This makes us sad, but our neighbours have reassured us that as soon as we start watering, most things will come back! Huzzah! We are really lucky in that we have organic farming neighbours who seem really happy that we’ve come to tend the land, and have offered their help with anything we need; if only our Spanish was good enough to understand them (sigh) but gesticulating seems to be working for now.

When we were over in September we feasted on the fruit from the garden (despite nothing being watered in years). There were pomegranates growing like weeds laden with fruit. There were red and green grapes and loads of ripe figs. We were mega happy and running round like kids in a sweetshop!

Fresh pomegranates anyone?
Fresh pomegranates anyone?

As well as these trees and vines we also have 11 olives. They are ancient, and they’re all split at the base having been copiced years ago. We’ve been told this is because way-back-when, olive farmers used to be paid by the number of olive trees they had, and if a tree was copiced they would be paid per new offshoot. We love our old wonky olive trees and cant wait until next November to do our first harvest (and then probably lose them all due to not really understanding brining or storing, but its all a learning curve).

Oh, and we also have the saddest looking citrus tree. Its so sad we can’t tell if its an orange, lime or lemon, and we’re not holding our breath for it to come back to be honest. We can all but hope and give it love.

Prickly pears
Prickly pears

On the lower terrace there is a row of really healthy looking old cacti. Prickly pears. They bear edible fruit, but their prickles are really prickly so we need to work a way around that one!

I think that’s it in terms of where the land lays. I think it’ll all have to begin by tackling the long dry grass that covers the land. That’ll be fun IMAG3338I’m sure!